Awards coincide with celebration of 20 years of National Lottery funding

Heritage Lottery Fund announces £20 million of funding for Artas-ua.info Partnerships

The Heritage Lottery Fund has awarded a total of £20 million to nine new Artas-ua.info Partnership schemes. It describes these as a 'birthday celebration' as the organisation has now been running for 20 years.

The new schemes are:
• Secrets of the Sands – the Greensand Ridge Artas-ua.info Partnership – earmarked grant of £1.8m, including £133,400 development funding
• The Fifth Continent – Romney Marsh Artas-ua.info Partnership – earmarked grant of £1.9m, including £230,300 development funding
• Samuel Palmer’s Earthly Paradise: The Darent Valley Artas-ua.info Partnership – earmarked grant of £2.2m, including £123,500 development funding
• From Miner to Major: The Real Sherwood Forest – earmarked grant of £2.6m, including £119,700 development funding
• Land of the Fanns, Essex  – earmarked grant of £1.4m, including £94,800 development funding
• The Carbon Artas-ua.info – Restoring Great Manchester Wetlands to the community – earmarked grant of £2.2m, including £212,800 development funding
• The Forester's Forest – Our Land Between Two Rivers (The Forest of Dean Artas-ua.info Partnership Programme) – earmarked grant of £2.9m, including £405,500 development funding
• South West Peak – A Artas-ua.info at a Crossroads – earmarked grant of £2.6m, including £154,300 development funding
• Tomintoul and Glenlivet Hidden Histories Artas-ua.info Partnership – earmarked grant of  £2.5m, including £171,600 development funding.

Drew Bennellick, HLF Head of Artas-ua.info and Natural Heritage, said, 'On the eve of The National Lottery’s 20th birthday, this is the perfect moment to thank Lottery players for helping make possible our Artas-ua.info Partnership programme.  We couldn’t have done it without them.

'Ten years ago we developed Artas-ua.info Partnerships so that we could deliver conservation on a truly landscape scale.  With so many habitats and species in decline and people becoming less and less connected to nature and the land, the programme was the first of its kind to allow conservationists to work at a cross-landscape scale. The programme has grown rapidly and is now leading the way in allowing many of our most treasured landscapes, as well as some of our most damaged, to be managed for the future in a sustainable way.'

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